Cover Feature

October 27, 2020

If you ask the average person what Atlantic City, New Jersey, is known for, the most likely response would be “gambling.” However, Atlantic City boasts an international treasure that predates the 1976 referendum legalizing gaming in the seaside resort by more than four decades. Tucked within the walls of Jim Whelan Boardwalk Hall, originally known as the Atlantic City Convention Hall, is an instrument of colossal proportions boasting seven manuals, 449 ranks, and some 33,112 pipes. Built between 1929 and 1932 by the Midmer-Losh Organ Company of Merrick, Long Island, the organ is a monument of music and technology.

The end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century ushered in a dramatic shift in the art of organbuilding. Electricity brought about daily changes in all aspects of life, and organbuilders were eager to harness its possibilities. No longer bound by the limitations of mechanical or tubular-pneumatic actions, pipes could be located remotely throughout a building or in some extreme cases, other buildings and outdoors! Builders were pioneering their own electric actions, eager to outdo their competitors and build on their own successes. The Hutchings-Votey Organ Company built a sizable instrument for Yale’s Woolsey Hall from 1902 to 1903 that would see great expansion over the next two decades into the superlative instrument we know today. At the same time, the Los Angeles Art Organ Company was building a lavish instrument for the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. At the time of its construction, it was the largest pipe organ in the world with more than 10,000 pipes. It would later become the nucleus of the Wanamaker Organ in Philadelphia, where it has nearly tripled in size.

In the early 20th century, Atlantic City went through a radical building boom, and many of the seaside resort’s cottages and boarding houses were replaced with large hotels. The moderate summer temperatures and ocean breezes brought visitors by the thousands. By the 1920s, tourism was at its peak, causing many historians to deem that era “Atlantic City’s Golden Age.” Prohibition was enacted in 1919 but went largely unenforced in Atlantic City. With many local officials turning a blind eye to the illegal sale and consumption of alcohol, spirits could be readily obtained at restaurants and speakeasies, and the resort’s popularity grew further still. 

In November 1923, Mayor Edward L. Bader initiated a public referendum at which time residents approved the construction of a convention hall. Construction began in August 1926, and the building was officially opened in June 1929. At the time of its construction, the building was the world’s largest auditorium and covered seven acres. The arena, where the Midmer-Losh organ is located, measures 487 feet long, 288 feet wide, and 137 feet high. The barrel-shaped ceiling is supported by the building’s walls rather than pillars, granting an unobstructed view from one end of the room to the other.  In its original configuration, the building was a multi-purpose room that could serve as a convention hall, sports arena, and concert venue. Fixed seating in balconies ran along three of the walls, but the bulk of the seating was in bleachers or moveable chairs on the main floor. When opened the arena could hold more than 40,000 people at full capacity. Following a $90 million renovation in 1999, the capacity of the arena was reduced to just over 14,000 but with greatly improved sight lines and better access and amenities.

One of the key players responsible for the creation of the mammoth organ was a senator by the name of Emerson Lewis Richards. A lawyer and politician by profession, Richards was enthralled by pipe organs from an early age. He was well-traveled, spending a great deal of time in Europe studying historical instruments, and was well acquainted with many of the finest organbuilders and organists of the time. His family’s wealth enabled him to install numerous pipe organs in his palatial home, located only ten blocks from Convention Hall. His home instruments were a laboratory for testing new pipework, and he was notorious for swapping ranks of pipes with some frequency. One of the largest of his residence instruments, Aeolian-Skinner Opus 1047 (four manuals, 146 ranks), was built for the senator in 1944 and moved a few years later in 1948 to First Baptist Church of Denver, Colorado, where it still resides. His vision of the “perfect” pipe organ morphed considerably throughout his life, and his contributions to organbuilding cannot be overstated.

It was Richards who was the champion and mastermind behind the installation of a pipe organ in the Convention Hall. While a pipe organ would not have been uncommon in a civic building of the time, the senator used his influence to convince city officials that it would be more cost effective to spend a large sum of money up front to build an organ and then only need one organist to play it, rather than to hire a large orchestra or band every time live music was needed in the hall. The size of the instrument would have to be enormous to fill the space and lead 40,000 people in song.

Richards’s initial design called for an astonishing 592 ranks and 43,641 pipes. Space and budget constraints mercifully intervened, and the revised scheme was reduced to 403 ranks and 29,646 pipes. By the time construction was complete, the instrument grew to its present 449 ranks and 33,112 pipes. The twenty divisions of the organ are located in eight chambers at the front and center of the room. W. W. Kimball, M. P. Möller, and Midmer-Losh submitted bids for the contract. Kimball’s price was the highest at $467,617. Möller came in lower at $418,850, and the lowest bid of $347,200 came from Midmer-Losh. All of the bids were still over the $300,000 budget established by the city, but Richards pointed out that if the instrument was to fit the budget exactly, it would have to be smaller than what was, at the time, the largest organ—the Wanamaker organ in nearby Philadelphia. The fact that the city provided the extra money suggests that perhaps having the world’s largest organ was indeed part of Atlantic City’s agenda. Ultimately, Richards was able to insert a clause into the contract, which the builder accepted; it gave him the power as the architect of the organ to make any change to the contract at any time with the builder bearing the cost. Richards invoked the clause on numerous occasions with devastating financial results for the Midmer-Losh company.

Construction on the organ, Midmer-Losh’s Opus 5550, began in May 1929 and was completed in December 1932. The first two divisions to be played were the Brass Chorus and String II on July 28, 1929. They were played from a used three-manual Möller theatre organ console. As construction continued the instrument was played from the five-manual “portable” console until the seven-manual console was completed. James Winter, an electrician for Midmer-Losh, gave the first public recital on May 11, 1932, during the Atlantic City Fair.

The contract for the organ was signed only a few months before the Great Depression began, but the money for the organ was not affected and construction continued. In fact, in some ways, the Great Depression may have contributed to the success of the instrument. While other organbuilding firms were downsizing or ceasing operation altogether, there was plentiful work in Atlantic City and many of the best and brightest minds in organbuilding were associated with the project. Employees from Estey, Steere, Odell, Marr & Colton, Dennison, Gottfried, and Wurlitzer all found their way to Atlantic City, and their contributions can be seen and heard throughout the instrument. In the end, however, the project was not exempt from the financial struggles of the Depression, which led to the Midmer-Losh company and Atlantic City to be in conflict over the completion of the instrument.

The contentious end to the construction of the instrument was perhaps a foreshadowing of its future. Following the official completion of the organ, signed on December 5, 1932, the Midmer-Losh company was required for one year to keep two men at the job to carry out maintenance and, in effect, continue the tonal regulation that would have otherwise been completed during the actual construction period. One of the men tasked with this assignment was Roscoe Evans, who would remain in Atlantic City and become the organ’s first curator. His greatest challenge was the combination action for the seven-manual console. The complex machinery to control 1,235 stop tabs and 240 pistons was located in two rooms in the basement below the stage. The combination of delicate metal traces and machinery contained in wooden boxes proved a disastrous pairing, especially with a steam line running through one of the rooms! The combination action was so troublesome that it was decommissioned after only two years. The great Atlantic hurricane that struck the island in 1944 inundated the basement levels of the hall with 15 million gallons of seawater, permanently damaging the combination action and requiring extensive repair to the blowers and their motors.

Evans retired in the early 1950s, and his successor was William Rosser. Rosser continued the daunting effort of single-handedly trying to keep the largest pipe organ in the world playing. The organ was used for the 1964 Democratic National Convention held at the Hall, but by that time the instrument was already exhibiting problems. By 1962, the Gallery I reeds were no longer being used. There may have been other portions that were unplayable or only marginally playable by then as well. While there is considerable documentation from Evans’s tenure, there are no records from Rosser’s time. A stipulation for holding the 1964 convention in Atlantic City was the installation of air conditioning. While no doubt enjoyed by convention attendees and many others in the following years, leaks from condensate pans caused significant problems and plunged more of the instrument into silence. Dennis McGurk joined Rosser as his assistant in 1959. While he had no background in organbuilding, he was a quick learner and in 1984 succeeded Rosser as the third curator of organs. McGurk recalled, “Pretty much all of the organ was working when I arrived in 1959. Since that time, however, it has slowly but surely gone downhill. Roof leaks in the ’70s caused most of the damage in the two upper chambers, and the simple fact of the matter is that the authorities had little interest in spending money on repairs at a time when the City as a whole was in decline.” McGurk had the unenviable and discouraging task of keeping what little of the organ he could playable with limited budget and materials. But, perhaps his greatest contribution was keeping those who wished to simply discard the instrument at bay, thus preserving it for future restoration. McGurk retired at the end of 1998. Prior to his retirement, the Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ Society was formed to raise awareness of the instrument and begin the process of fundraising for its restoration. This group was instrumental in protecting the instrument during the 1998 building renovation and furthering McGurk’s advocation that the instrument be saved and not relegated to the scrap pile.

My first visit to Atlantic City was in the winter of 2007. At that time, the organ could not be played from the console, but that did little to dampen my excitement. The sheer size of the room, the scaling of the pipework, and seemingly endless chambers were enough of a sensory overload for a first visit. The downside to the visit was the confirmation of my study of and readings concerning the condition of the organ and the sad state of affairs of the instrument. Thankfully by that time, there was a glimmer of hope as Carl Loeser, the fourth curator of organs, was leading his staff and volunteers to mitigate the worst of the damage and prevent further destruction or loss.

Fast forward to September 1, 2015, when I began my tenure as the fifth curator of organs. The Midmer-Losh was basically a large two-manual instrument with about 25% functionality. Only the Right Stage chamber was working, with the Great, Solo, and Solo-Great divisions playing from their respective keyboards with limited sub and super coupling available to other manuals. Expression was negligible, and the shades were more for visual effect, flapping earnestly for the audience to see, but doing little to change the actual volume or timbre of the sound emanating from the chamber. Making music was a challenge at best, and subtlety and nuance were almost totally elusive. By 2015, much restoration work had already been done to the Swell division in the Left Stage chamber, but much more work in the chamber needed to be completed before pipework could be returned to the Swell chests. The other divisions in the Left Stage chamber—Swell-Choir, Unenclosed Choir, and String I—all must be accessed through the Swell, and to have put in even a few ranks in the Swell would have been far too risky. Work began in earnest to remove pipework and chests for restoration. The Swell-Choir manual windchests were sent to Columbia Organ Leathers of Columbia, Pennsylvania, for restoration, while the offset chests, tremulants, and regulators were completed in-house. Fifty-eight ranks of pipes were sent to Oyster Pipe Works of Louisville, Ohio, for restoration and repair.

On-site work at Boardwalk Hall is accomplished by a staff of six; four are full-time and two are part-time. We are assisted in our efforts by a significant group of dedicated volunteers. While this may seem like a large number by today’s standards, at the height of construction the Midmer-Losh company employed more than sixty! An early aid was a work symposium co-sponsored by the American Institute of Organbuilders and the Historic Organ Restoration Committee (the 501(c)(3) non-profit organization now overseeing the restoration of the pipe organs at Boardwalk Hall). The symposium was held in February 2016 and brought fifteen organbuilders from across the country to join the staff and volunteers at Boardwalk Hall. During that symposium, we focused on the restoration and releathering of much of the Pedal Left chest work. These efforts combined with the work completed in the Unenclosed Choir and String I allowed those divisions to be played publicly for the first time in decades during the Organ Historical Society convention on July 1, 2016.

The Swell division is the powerhouse of the Left Stage chamber, boasting 55 ranks, twenty of which are mixtures. While most Swell divisions are usually based on a 16′ string or stopped flute, the chorus here is based on a 16′ Double Diapason. The diapason chorus continues with two 8′ diapasons and extends logically upwards to the lower-pitched Furniture V, the spicy Cymbal VIII, and finally the Plein Jeu VII for brilliance and sparkle. The Harmonic Flute 8′ and its Celeste are the softest stops in the division and are hauntingly beautiful. Three pairs of celestes provide lushness, and unison strings at 16′, 8′, and 4′ provide additional clarity. Two reed choruses on 15 inches and 30 inches crown the ensemble. The lower-pressure chorus is based on the chocolatey Double Horn 16′ and is a darker and more noble chorus. The high-pressure chorus adds fire and gravity to the full ensemble with the Field Trumpet 8′ blazing through for a final punch. Perhaps the most unique reed in the Swell division is the Muted Trumpet 8′. Its 3/4-length, thin-scaled resonators remind one of an orchestral oboe. While its tone is quite lovely alone, it is perhaps most useful in coloring other stops, and its application opens up a wealth of solo possibilities.

On paper, the Swell division is curiously devoid of mutations, particularly given its large number of ranks! The answer lies immediately adjacent to the Swell. The appropriately named Swell-Choir division is meant to supplement both the Swell and Choir divisions with the entirety of its resources playable independently from both the Swell and Choir keyboards. This division provides color reeds, softer flues, and an extensive array of mutations. Independently expressive from the Swell, the division contains 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 11th mutations. Their use is further enhanced through unification providing pitches from 62⁄5′ all the way up to 1⁄4′. Also available in the Swell-Choir are a clarinet, oboe, and vox humana, all available at 16′, 8′, and 4′. A trio of gemshorns, one celeste tuned sharp and the other flat, further expand the utility of this division. Also in the Left Stage chamber is the String I division. Twenty ranks of strings all voiced on 25 inches of wind provide unmistakably powerful beauty. Housed within its own expression box, the String I division rounds out the immense expressive capabilities of the Left Stage chamber.

While the vast majority of the Left Stage chamber’s resources are enclosed, the loudest and softest voices are unenclosed. The Unenclosed Choir is voiced on 33⁄4 inches, the lowest pressure in the organ, and was a significant forerunner of the organ reform movement. By contrast, the Grand Choir division is the upward extension of the Pedal Left voices and boasts pipework voiced on 20 inches to 50 inches. In the Pedal Left division, the Bombarde 32′ has wooden resonators for the 32′ and 16′ octaves giving it a darker, heavier bass. Shallot construction changes no fewer than three times throughout the compass, and metal construction from 8′ C up with harmonic and double harmonic length resonators gives this voice powerful treble ascendency and allows it to bloom into a powerful solo voice in the upper register. The Major Posaune 16′ is voiced on 50 inches and is a staggeringly powerful voice reminiscent of a trombone playing fff. Finally, the Fagotto 32′ with its smaller resonators and relatively lower pressure of 20 inches finds great use under softer ensembles and is equally at home undergirding a full string ensemble.

By the latter half of 2018, the restoration work in the Left Stage chamber was largely complete, and we were able to turn some of our attention back to the Right Stage chamber. The Right Stage chamber has always been considered the “show chamber” due to its immediate proximity to the organ shop and curator’s office. Even during the darkest days of Dennis McGurk’s tenure when he was forced to shut off large portions of the instrument, he was able to continue to maintain and care for this chamber. The timing was fortuitous as another convention was looming: the Mid-Atlantic regional convention of the American Guild of Organists was to be held on July 3, 2019. While the chamber had been playing regularly since 2013, it was still riddled with dead notes and problematic issues. Carl Loeser completed considerable work in 2013 and 2014, releathering the three large pitman chests in the Solo division. This made it the most reliable of the divisions in the Right Stage chamber. Several of the lower and more accessible windchests in the Great division had also been releathered under the supervision of Dennis McGurk. To best utilize time and materials, we took on the task of releathering and repairing chests with the loudest and most important stops in the Great. The 30-inch-pressure windchest containing the First and Second 8′ Open Diapasons and Rausch Quint II was taken out of the chamber and completely restored. Two levels above it, the chest holding the Furniture VI was repaired in place. The Grand Great chests, the upward extensions of the Pedal Right stops, were also taken out of the chamber for complete restoration with new leather, gasketing, and magnets. A systematic process of rebuilding all of the pedal primaries has eliminated the vast majority of the irritating dead notes in the pedal.

The Great division boasts an incredible ten 8′ diapasons, each with its own character through the use of various construction techniques and pressures. These ten 8′s are undergirded by a 32′ Sub Principal and three 16′ Double Diapasons. Continuing up the chorus, you will find no fewer than five 4′ Octaves and three 2′ Fifteenths. An eleven-rank Grand Cornet, five-rank Major Sesquialtera, and two mixtures serve to complete the chorus. In a letter dated April 11, 1932, Senator Richards wrote to Henry Willis, III, saying “When the whole chorus is on from 32′ up to Mixtures, even the 50-inch reeds have no chance with it in power and brilliance. A demonstration that reeds are unnecessary except for a change in color.” Indeed, the Great reed chorus is quite small considering the size of the division, with only three trumpets at 16′, 8′, and 4′ pitches, albeit playing on 30 inches of wind.

The Solo division stands its own ground with a powerful Stentor Diapason 8′, Octave 4′, and Grand Chorus IX mixture; the division includes two sets of celestes and a complete flute chorus including the soaring Tibia Rex. The division’s real claim to fame, however, is its brilliant reed chorus. With pressures ranging from 30 inches to 100 inches, the chorus includes a softer Trumpet Profunda playing at 16′, 8′, and 4′, frequently used as a chorus reed. By contrast the Tuba Magna, also 16′, 8′, and 4′, plays on 50 inches and has a powerful, clear tone. Providing blazing clarity is the brass Bugle 8′, also on 50 inches. Finally, the whole ensemble is crowned by the Tuba Imperial, voiced by Roscoe Evans and playing on 100 inches of wind. Where the Solo division excels in sheer power, the neighboring Solo-Great division shines through with subtlety and color. Divided into separately expressible flue and reed ensembles, the Solo-Great is similar in concept to the Swell-Choir division in the Left Stage chamber. Like the Swell-Choir, the Solo-Great has a wealth of mutations from 102⁄3′ to 1⁄4′, two sets of softer celestes, and delicate flutes.  Eleven ranks of color reeds, six extended down to 16′, provide a wide array of solo choices.

Where the Pedal Left division is predominately darker in order to support the expressive divisions above it, the Pedal Right division must stand up to the bold choruses in the Great and Solo divisions. The 32′ Tibia is colossal in scale, and more than a few pipes in the 32′ octave have been repaired by crawling in the mouth and standing upright in the pipe. The 32′ Bombardon is voiced on 40 inches of wind and has metal resonators, the lowest of which is 24 inches in diameter. The Diaphone Phonon 16′ on 50 inches is unmistakable in its power from practically anywhere in the building. Perhaps the most notorious stop on the Midmer-Losh organ is the loudest organ stop in the world: the Grand Ophicleide. Voiced on 100 inches of wind, it is actually a pedal stop that is extended up to 85 notes to allow it to play on the seven-octave Great keyboard. In the Pedal, the stop plays at 16′ and gives an unrelenting power to the pedal line, while in the manuals its sheer power and tone cut through even the largest of registrations with ferocious clout. When a chord is released its tone seems to reverberate in the cavernous hall, long after the rest of the organ’s sound has died away. The 64′ Dulzian, one of only two real 64′ stops in the world, gives a final dramatic punch when a 32′ just won’t do! 

A continuing project since 2017 has been the restoration of the Choir division. Located in the Left Forward chamber, this is the first of the Gallery level chambers that we have addressed. Funding already in place from a settlement following damage to the winding and relay for this chamber during the 1999–2000 renovation of the building made this the most logical and financially feasible chamber to begin with (outside of the two main chambers). The Choir division is no diminutive organ, boasting 37 ranks. It has a wealth of undulating stops, complete diapason chorus, orchestral and high-pressure reeds, and multiple open 16′ stops. Restoration is now approximately 50% complete with all of the offset chests, tremulants, and four of the six large pitman chests completed. Flue pipe restoration has been completed in house or by A. R. Schopp’s Sons of Alliance, Ohio, who restored the badly damaged Dulciana, Dulciana Celeste, and Acuta VI. Along with other projects in the shop, work will continue on this chamber as time permits.

Perhaps the most significant musical turning point for the Midmer-Losh organ in modern times has been the installation of a new combination action. While it was a technological marvel of its time, its complexity and installation in a difficult environment prevented it from ever working properly. The initial plan had been to restore the movable five-manual console first and the larger seven-manual console at a later date. However, as more and more of the instrument was brought online, it became clear that not having a functioning combination action was a major hindrance. After many months of tracing cables and intensive study, we determined that a portion of the existing system in the seven-manual console could be put to use again. The existing tablets and their magnets were in good working order, and the boxes containing the mechanical components for the system in the basement made for a logical and accessible location to tie new wiring into the system. The piston rails from each of the seven keyboards were taken off and rewired, allowing all the thumb and toe pistons to be used. While it is a departure from our desire to restore the organ to its original state, the incorporation of a modern multilevel combination action has proven remarkably beneficial, and organists are now able to showcase the instrument as it was intended.

With the completion of the Left Stage chamber and the extensive repairs completed in the Right Stage chamber, the organ is now a reliable and manageable instrument. We have turned the corner from simply having a large collection of pipes to hearing a beautiful and truly musical instrument. At the time of this writing, 238 of the 449 ranks are playing—53% of the organ—all in only two of the eight chambers! With each rank brought online and the instrument becoming a more cohesive whole, the brilliance of the organ’s designer and architect, Senator Emerson Richards, becomes ever more apparent. New and exciting projects are already on the horizon as we work to restore the first of the ranks in the Center chambers. Both of the 100-inch reeds in Gallery I will soon come online as we work to bring more sound to the center of the room. Upon the completion of the Choir division, we will move to the Gallery I and II divisions, across to Gallery III and IV, and finally to the String II and Brass Chorus, completing the work on the Gallery level divisions before we undertake the herculean task of restoring the Echo and Fanfare organs in the ceiling of Boardwalk Hall.

Not to be forgotten is the magnificent W. W. Kimball pipe organ located in the Adrian Phillips Theater, adjacent to the main arena where the Midmer-Losh organ resides. In any other setting, this organ would be the showcase instrument with four manuals and 55 ranks, but it is often overshadowed by its larger neighbor. The Kimball organ is largely playable and restored thanks to efforts by previous curator Carl Loeser who had the console restored by the Crome Organ Company. Through the generosity of the American Theatre Organ Society, a pair of grants were awarded to HORC to complete the releathering of chests in the Main (left stage) and Solo (right stage) divisions and to restore the Brass Trumpet, a unique example of this stop in a Kimball organ. 

Both pipe organs at Boardwalk Hall have now returned to regular use and are a significant part of the life and events here. Recitals are enjoyed every week year-round on Wednesdays at noon and every weekday during the summer season from Memorial Day through Labor Day. In 2019, we welcomed 1,688 visitors for the Curator’s tour, 1,249 for the brief tour, and 4,093 visitors for the noon recitals. Through creative collaboration with the management of Boardwalk Hall, we are able to offer the organ for use to a multitude of events. The Midmer-Losh has been requested to play the prelude to a rodeo as well as for wrestling championships, numerous graduation ceremonies, and Miss America pageants. Likewise, the Kimball organ sees regular use for award ceremonies, banquets, and religious gatherings in the Theater. We look forward to bringing more of the instruments back online and furthering their outreach to the Atlantic City community and the world!

—Nathan L. Bryson, Curator of Pipe Organs at Boardwalk Hall

Cover photo credt: Michael Sluzenski.

PEDAL RIGHT

64′ Diaphone 

32′ Sub Principal

32′ Contra Tibia 97 pipes

21-1⁄3′ Tibia Quint 

16′ Diaphone Phonon (50′′) 39 pipes

16′ Diapason

16′ Principal 109 pipes

16′ Diapason 

16′ Geigen Principal

16′ Tibia Major 85 pipes

16′ Grand Bourdon

16′ Major Flute

16′ Wald Flute

16′ Tibia Clausa

16′ Viol 85 pipes

12-4⁄5′ Gross Tierce 68 pipes

10-2⁄3′ Diaphone Quint (50′′)

10-2⁄3′ Tibia Quint

10-2⁄3′ Tibia Quint

10-2⁄3′ Principal Quint

10-2⁄3′ Minor Quint

9-1⁄7′ Septieme 68 pipes

8′ Octave Principal

8′ Octave Major

8′ Octave Diapason

8′ Octave Geigen

8′ Gross Gemshorn

8′ Tibia Major

8′ Tibia Clausa

8′ Doppel Gedeckt

8′ Octave Viol

6-2⁄5′ Gross Tierce

5-1⁄3′ Tibia Quint

5-1⁄3′ Principal Quint

5-1⁄3′ Tibia Quint

4-4⁄7′ Gross Septieme

4′ Super Octave

4′ Super Octave

4′ Tibia Fifteenth

4′ Flute Fifteenth

4′ Viol Fifteenth

3-1⁄5′ Tierce

2-2⁄3′ Flute Nineteenth

2-2⁄3′ Tibia Major Nineteenth

2-2⁄3′ Viol Nineteenth

2-2⁄7′ Septieme

2′ Tibia Twenty-Second

2′ Flageolet

1-3⁄5′ Octave Tierce

1-1⁄3′ Tibia Twenty-Sixth

1-1⁄7′ Octave Septieme

1′ Flute Twenty-Ninth

Mixture

64′ Dulzian 85 pipes

42-2⁄3′ Contra Dulzquint

32′ Contra Bombardon 85 pipes

32′ Contra Dulzian

21-1⁄3′ Dulzian Quint

16′ Grand Ophicleide (100′′) 85 pipes

16′ Tuba Magna (50′′)

16′ Bombardon

16′ Trumpet Profunda

16′ Dulzian

16′ Trumpet 97 pipes

16′ Saxophone

16′ Krummhorn

16′ Oboe Horn

16′ English Horn

16′ French Horn

16′ Vox Baryton

10-2⁄3′ Bombard Quint

10-2⁄3′ Dulzian Quint

8′ Ophicleide (100′′)

8′ Octave Bombardon

8′ Octave Dulzian

8′ Bugle (50′′)

8′ Trumpet

8′ Octave Krummhorn

8′ Vox Baryton

5-1⁄3′ Trumpet Quint

5-1⁄3′ Bombardon Quint

4′ Dulzian Fifteenth

4′ Trumpet Fifteenth

Reed Mixture V

Brass Chorus (floating)

Pedal Divide

PEDAL LEFT

32′ Diaphone (50′′) 97 pipes

32′ Diapason 97 pipes

16′ Diaphone (50′′)

16′ Major Diapason 32 pipes

16′ Diaphone 85 pipes

16′ Diapason

16′ Diapason

16′ Tibia Clausa 85 pipes

16′ Doppel Gedeckt

16′ Stopped Diapason

16′ Bass Viol 85 pipes

16′ Bass Viol

16′ Bass Gamba

16′ Cone Gamba

10-2⁄3′ Quint Diapason

10-2⁄3′ Stopped Quint

10-2⁄3′ Cone Quint

8′ Octave Gemshorn

8′ Octave Diaphone (50′′)

8′ Octave Diapason

8′ Octave Phonon

8′ Gross Flute

8′ Flute Clarabella

8′ Cello

6-2⁄5′ Terz

5-1⁄3′ Twelfth

4-4⁄7′ Octave Septieme

4′ Fife (50′′)

4′ Super Octave

4′ Gemshorn Fifteenth

4′ Flute Fifteenth

3-1⁄5′ Tierce

2-2⁄3′ Nineteenth

2-2⁄7′ Twenty-First

2′ Gemshorn Twenty-Second

2′ Twenty-Second

2′ Fife

1′ Twenty-Ninth

Stentor Sesquialtera VII 224 pipes

Grave Mixture VI

32′ Contra Bombard (50′′) 97 pipes

32′ Fagotto 109 pipes

16′ Major Posaune (50′′) 44 pipes

16′ Bombard (50′′)

16′ Trumpet

16′ Horn

16′ Bass Clarinet

16′ Fagotto

16′ Oboe

16′ Vox Humana

8′ Major Posaune (50′′)

8′ Octave Bombard (50′′)

8′ Octave Clarinet

8′ Octave Fagotto

8′ Octave Oboe

5-1⁄3′ Horn Twelfth

4′ Bombard Fifteenth

4′ Oboe Fifteenth

4′ Horn Fifteenth

2-2⁄3′ Horn Nineteenth

2′ Fagotto Twenty-Second

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

String III (floating)

Gallery I Reeds (floating)

Gallery II Flutes (floating)

Gallery III Diapasons (floating)

Gallery IV Orchestral (floating)

PEDAL RIGHT GALLERY

32′ Contra Violone

16′ Diaphone

16′ Flute Maggiorre

16′ Flute Bourdon

16′ Spire Flute

16′ Contra Bass

16′ Contra Viol

16′ Double Bass

16′ Contra Viol

16′ Contra Gamba

10-2⁄3′ Flute Quint

8′ Cone Flute

8′ Viol 

4′ Viol

16′ Trumpet Sonora (100′′)

16′ Tuba D’Amour

16′ Chalumeau

16′ Contra Bassoon

16′ Vox Baryton

8′ Bassoon

PEDAL LEFT GALLERY

16′ Grand Diapason

16′ Dulciana

16′ Major Flute

16′ Double Melodia

8′ Melodia Flute

32′ Contra Trombone

16′ Posaune (50′′)

16′ Bombardon

16′ Trombone

16′ Trombone

16′ Saxophone

10-2⁄3′ Tromba Quint

8′ Trombone

8′ Tromba

6-2⁄5′ Tromba Tierce

5-1⁄3′ Tromba Quint

3-1⁄5′ Tromba Seventeenth

PEDAL PERCUSSION

Cymbal

Persian Cymbal

Snare Drum Roll

Snare Drum Roll

Snare Drum Strike

FF Bass Drum Strike

FF Bass Drum Roll

FF Contra Drum Roll

FF Contra Drum Strike

Persian Cymbal

Persian Cymbal

Chinese Gong Roll

Chinese Gong Strike

Cymbal

Snare Drum Roll

Snare Drum Roll

Bass Drum Roll

Bass Drum Strike

Bass Drum Roll

Bass Drum Strike

Bass Drum Roll

Bass Drum Strike

FF Contra Drum Roll

FF Contra Drum Strike

MP Contra Drum Roll

Bass Drum Strike

16′ Piano

8′ Piano

Chimes

PEDAL SECOND TOUCH

64′ Dulzian Diaphone

32′ Diaphone (50′′)

16′ Diaphone

16′ Tibia Major

16′ Contra Viol

8′ Tibia Major

8′ Viol

4′ Tibia

4′ Viola

64′ Dulzian

32′ Contra Bombard (50′′)

32′ Contra Bombardon

16′ Ophicleide (100′′)

16′ Posaune

16′ Bombard (50′′)

16′ Bombardon

8′ Octave Ophicleide (100′′)

8′ Posaune (50′′)

8′ Bombardon

8′ Dulzian

4′ Bombard (50′′)

4′ Dulzian

Chimes

Brass Chorus (floating)

Fanfare (floating)

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

Gallery Reeds I (floating)

Gallery Diapasons III (floating)

SWELL-CHOIR (Manual III)

16′ Gross Gedeckt 97 pipes

16′ Stopped Diapason 104 pipes

16′ Cone Gamba 97 pipes

8′ Gemshorn 97 pipes

8′ Gemshorn Celeste 97 pipes

8′ Gemshorn Celeste 97 pipes

8′ Dopple Gedeckt 

8′ Dopple Spitz Flute 97 pipes

8′ Clarabella 92 pipes

8′ Stopped Diapason

8′ Muted Gamba

6-2⁄5′ Terz 97 pipes

5-1⁄3′ Major Fifth 97 pipes

5-1⁄3′ Gamba Quint 

5-1⁄3′ Gemshorn Quint

4-4⁄7′ Septieme 97 pipes

4′ Octave Gemshorn

4′ Spitz Flute

4′ Clarabella

4′ Dopple Flute

4′ Stopped Flute

4′ Zauber Flute 97 pipes

4′ Cone Flute

3-5⁄9′ Ninth 85 pipes

3-1⁄5′ Major Tenth 

3-1⁄5′ Gemshorn Tenth 

2-10⁄11′ Eleventh 85 pipes

2-2⁄3′ Gemshorn Twelfth 

2-2⁄3′ Twelfth  

2-2⁄3′ Flute Twelfth 

2-2⁄3′ Stopped Flute Twelfth 

2-2⁄7′ Octave Septieme 

2′ Gemshorn Fifteenth 

2′ Gedeckt Fifteenth  

2′ Magic Flute

1-7⁄9′ Sixteenth

1-3⁄5′ Major Seventeenth 

1-3⁄5′ Gemshorn Seventeenth 

1-5⁄11′ Eighteenth 

1-1⁄3′ Major Nineteenth 

1-1⁄3′ Gemshorn Ninteenth 

1-1⁄7′ Twenty-First

1′ Twenty-Second

1′ Zauber Flute Twenty-Second 

8⁄9′ Twenty-Third

4⁄5′ Twenty-Fourth

8⁄11′ Twenty-Fifth

2⁄3′ Twenty-Sixth

1⁄2′ Twenty-Ninth

1⁄3′ Thirty-Third

1⁄4′ Thirty-Sixth

32′ Fagotto

16′ Contra Oboe 85 pipes

16′ Bass Clarinet 97 pipes

16′ Bass Vox Humana 97 pipes

8′ Oboe

8′ Clarinet

8′ Vox Humana

4′ Octave Oboe

4′ Octave Clarinet

4′ Vox Humana

8′ Marimba Repeat

8′ Marimba Stroke 61 bars

4′ Marimba Repeat

4′ Marimba Stroke

4′ Glockenspiel Single 49 bars

4′ Glockenspiel Repeat

2′ Glockenspiel Single

SWELL (Manual III)

16′ Double Diapason 104 pipes

16′ Contra Gamba 104 pipes

8′ Diapason 80 pipes

8′ Diapason 80 pipes

8′ Waldhorn 80 pipes

8′ Tibia Plena 80 pipes

8′ Hohl Flute 80 pipes

8′ Gross Gedeckt 80 pipes

8′ Harmonic Flute 80 pipes

8′ Harmonic Flute Celeste 80 pipes

8′ Gamba 80 pipes

8′ Gamba Celeste 80 pipes

8′ Violin 80 pipes

8′ Viol Celeste I (2 ranks) 148 pipes

8′ Viol Celeste II (2 ranks) 148 pipes

4′ Ocarina 80 pipes

4′ Octave 80 pipes

4′ Octave

4′ Traverse Flute 80 pipes

4′ Silver Flute 80 pipes

4′ Viol Salicet

4′ Viol Gambette 80 pipes

2′ Fifteenth 80 pipes

2′ Orchestral Piccolo 80 pipes

Plein Jeu VII 560 pipes

Cymbal VIII 640 pipes

Furniture V 400 pipes

16′ Double Trumpet 104 pipes

16′ Double Horn 104 pipes

8′ Harmonic Trumpet 80 pipes

8′ Field Trumpet 80 pipes

8′ Posaune 80 pipes

8′ Cornopean 80 pipes

8′ Muted Trumpet 80 pipes

8′ Flugel Horn 80 pipes

8′ Krummhorn 80 pipes

8′ Vox Humana 80 pipes

4′ Trumpet Clarion 80 pipes

4′ Trumpet Clarion

4′ Octave Horn

Brass Chorus (floating)

Gallery I Reeds (floating)

Gallery II Flutes (floating)

Gallery III Diapasons (floating)

Gallery IV Orchestral (floating)

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

String III (floating)

FANFARE (Manual V)

16′ Major Flute 85 pipes

8′ Stentor Diapason (fr. Stentor VII)

8′ Stentorphone 61 pipes

8′ Stentor Flute 61 pipes

8′ Pileata Magna 61 pipes

8′ Gamba Tuba 61 pipes

8′ Gamba Tuba Celeste 61 pipes

4′ Stentor Octave (fr. Stentor VII)

4′ Major Flute

4′ Flute Octaviante 61 pipes

4′ Gamba Clarion 61 pipes

2-2⁄3′ Twelfth Recorder 61 pipes

2′ Fife 61 pipes

Stentor VII 427 pipes

Cymbal V 305 pipes

Harmonic Mixture VI 366 pipes

16′ Contra Posaune (50′′) 85 pipes

16′ Contra Bombardon 97 pipes

16′ Contra Trombone 97 pipes

10-2⁄3′ Tromba Quint 85 pipes

8′ Harmonic Tuba (50′′) 73 pipes

4′ Tuba Melody (melody coupler)

8′ Ophicleide (50′′) 61 pipes

8′ Posaune (50′′)

8′ Bombard

8′ Tromba

8′ Trombone

6-2⁄5′ Tromba Tierce 73 pipes

5-1⁄3′ Tromba Fifth

5-1⁄3′ Trombone Fifth

4′ Harmonic Clarion (50′′)

4′ Major Clarion (50′′) 61 pipes

4′ Octave Posaune (50′′)

4′ Clarion

4′ Trombone Clarion

3-1⁄5′ Tromba Tenth

2-2⁄3′ Tromba Twelfth

2′ Clarine Fifteenth

Gallery I Reeds (floating)

Gallery II Flutes (floating)

Gallery III Diapasons (floating)

Gallery IV Orchestral (floating)

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

String III (floating)

GALLERY I (floating)

16′ Contra Diaphone 85 pipes

8′ Diaphone

8′ Diapason (fr. Mixture Mirabilis VII)

4′ Octave (fr. Mixture Mirabilis VII)

Mixture Mirabilis VII 511 pipes

16′ Trumpet Mirabilis (100′′) 85 pipes

16′ Trumpet Melody (melody coupler)

8′ Tuba Maxima (100′′) 73 pipes

8′ Trumpet Imperial (100′′)

4′ Clarion Mirabilis (100′′)

4′ Clarion Melody (melody coupler)

4′ Clarion Real (100′′)

GALLERY II (floating)

16′ Flute Maggiore 97 pipes

8′ Jubal Flute 73 pipes

4′ Jubal Melody (melody coupler)

8′ Harmonic Flute 73 pipes

4′ Melodic Flute

4′ Harmonic Flute 73 pipes

2-2⁄3′ Harmonic Twelfth 61 pipes

2′ Harmonic Piccolo 61 pipes

Harmonic Mixture III 183 pipes

GALLERY III (floating)

16′ Contra Diapason 97 pipes

8′ Diapason I 73 pipes

8′ Diapason II 73 pipes

4′ Octave I 73 pipes

4′ Octave II

2′ Fifteenth 73 pipes

Mixture IV 292 pipes

16′ Grand Piano 

8′ Grand Piano 

4′ Grand Piano

GALLERY IV (floating)

16′ Contra Saxophone 85 pipes

8′ Brass Trumpet 73 pipes

8′ Egyptian Horn 73 pipes

8′ Euphone 73 pipes

8′ Major Clarinet 73 pipes

8′ Major Oboe 73 pipes

8′ Musette Mirabilis 73 pipes

8′ Cor D’Orchestre 73 pipes

8′ Saxophone

4′ Octave Saxophone

STRING I (floating)

16′ Contra Basso 97 pipes

8′ Cello 73 pipes

8′ Cello Celeste I (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Cello Celeste II (2 ranks) 134 pipes

8′ Violins I (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Violins II (2 ranks) 134 pipes

8′ Violins III (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Violins IV (2 ranks) 134 pipes

8′ Viol Secundo I (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Viol Secundo II (2 ranks) 134 pipes

4′ Octave Viola

4′ Viol Secundo (2 ranks) 146 pipes

16′ String Melody (melody coupler)

4′ String Melody (melody coupler)

String Pizzicato

STRING II (floating)

16′ Double Bass 97 pipes

16′ Contra Bass 97 pipes

16′ Contra Viol 97 pipes

8′ Viola Diapason 73 pipes

8′ Viol Cello 73 pipes

8′ Cello Phonon 73 pipes

8′ Cello 73 pipes

8′ Cello Celeste (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Viola Phonon 73 pipes

8′ Viola Celeste (2 ranks) 134 pipes

8′ Violin Phonon 73 pipes

8′ Violin 73 pipes

8′ Viol Celeste I (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Viol Celeste II (2 ranks) 134 pipes

8′ Viol Celeste III (2 ranks) 134 pipes

8′ Viol Celeste IV (2 ranks) 134 pipes

8′ Viol Celeste V (2 ranks) 134 pipes

4′ Viol Principal 73 pipes

4′ Violin (2 ranks) 146 pipes

4′ Viola (2 ranks) 146 pipes

4′ Octave Cello I

4′ Octave Cello II

4′ Octave Violin

5-1⁄3′ Quint Flute 78 pipes

4′ Stopped Flute

2-2⁄3′ Flute Twelfth 73 pipes

2′ Piccolo

String Mixture V 305 pipes

8′ Tromba D’Amour 73 pipes

16′ String II Melody (melody coupler)

4′ String II Melody (melody coupler)

String II Pizzicato

STRING III (floating)

8′ Cello Celeste I (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Cello Celeste II (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Viola Celeste (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Violins I (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Violins II (2 ranks) 134 pipes

8′ Violins III (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Violins IV (2 ranks) 134 pipes

8′ Viol Secundo (2 ranks) 146 pipes

8′ Cor Anglais 73 pipes

16′ Grand Piano

8′ Grand Piano

4′ Grand Piano

UNENCLOSED CHOIR (Manual I)

16′ Quintaton 73 pipes

8′ Diapason 73 pipes

8′ Holz Flute 73 pipes

4′ Octave 73 pipes

2′ Fifteenth 73 pipes

Rausch Quint II 146 pipes

Mixture II 146 pipes

CHOIR (Manual I)

16′ Contra Melodia 109 pipes

16′ Contra Dulciana 92 pipes

8′ Diapason 73 pipes

8′ Diapason 73 pipes

8′ Gemshorn 73 pipes

8′ Gemshorn Celeste 73 pipes

8′ Dulciana

8′ Dulciana Celeste 73 pipes

8′ Philomela 73 pipes

8′ Melodia

8′ Concert Flute 73 pipes

8′ Unda Maris 73 pipes

8′ Nachthorn 73 pipes

8′ Viola Pomposa 73 pipes

8′ Viola Celeste 73 pipes

8′ Voix Celeste II 134 pipes

5-1⁄3′ Dulzquint

4′ Fugara 73 pipes

4′ Dolce 85 pipes

4′ Spindle Flute 73 pipes

4′ Flute Overte 73 pipes

2-2⁄3′ Melodia Twelfth

2-2⁄3′ Dulzard

2′ Flageolet 73 pipes

2′ Melodia

2′ Dulcett

1-1⁄3′ Dulce

1′ Dulcinett

Acuta VI 438 pipes

Flute Mixture III 219 pipes

Brass Chorus (floating)

16′ Contra Tromba 97 pipes

8′ Tromba Real 73 pipes

8′ Brass Cornet 73 pipes

8′ French Horn 73 pipes

8′ Clarinet 73 pipes

8′ Bassett Horn 73 pipes

8′ Cor Anglais 73 pipes

8′ Kinura 73 pipes

4′ Tromba Clarion

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

String III (floating)

Gallery I Reeds (floating)

Gallery II Flutes (floating)

Gallery III Diapasons (floating)

Gallery IV Orchestral (floating)

GRAND CHOIR (Manual I)

16′ Diaphone (50′′)

16′ Diapahone Melody (coupler)

8′ Diaphone (50′′)

8′ Diapason

8′ Diaphonic Diapason

8′ Tibia Clausa

8′ Viol Cello

16′ Bombard (50′′)

16′ Fagotto

8′ Posaune

8′ Bombard (50′′)

4′ Bombard Melody (melody coupler)

8′ Chalumeau

4′ Octave Oboe

CHOIR SECOND TOUCH (Manual I)

16′ Double Bass

16′ Contra Bass

16′ Contra Viol

8′ Viola

8′ Viol Cello

8′ Viol Cello

4′ Viol Cello

4′ Viol Cello

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

String III (floating)

Fanfare (coupler)

CHOIR-SWELL (Manual I)

16′ Doppel Gedeckt

16′ Stopped Diapason

16′ Cone Gamba

8′ Doppel Gedeckt

8′ Stopped Flute

8′ Clarabella

8′ Spitz Flute

8′ Gemshorn

8′ Gemshorn Celeste I

8′ Gemshorn Celeste II

8′ Muted Gamba

6-2⁄5′ Third

5-1⁄3′ Fifth

5-1⁄3′ Cone Gamba Fifth

5-1⁄3′ Gemshorn Fifth

4-4⁄7′ Seventh

4′ Doppel Flute

4′ Stopped Flute

4′ Clarabella

4′ Spitz Flute

4′ Zauber Flute

4′ Gemshorn

4′ Cone Flute

3-5⁄9′ Ninth

3-1⁄5′ Tenth

3-1⁄5′ Gemshorn Tenth

2-10⁄11′ Eleventh

2-2⁄3′ Flute Twelfth

2-2⁄3′ Flute Twelfth

2-2⁄3′ Gemshorn Twelfth

2-2⁄3′ Twelfth

2-2⁄7′ Fourteenth

2′ Flute

2′ Magic Flute

2′ Gemshorn  

1-7⁄9′ Sixteenth

1-3⁄5′ Gemshorn Seventeenth

1-3⁄5′ Seventeenth

1-5⁄11′ Eighteenth

1-1⁄3′ Nineteenth

1-1⁄3′ Gemshorn  

1-1⁄7′ Twenty-First

1′ Twenty-Second

1′ Gemshorn Twenty-Second

8⁄9′ Twenty-Third

4⁄5′ Twenty-Fourth

8⁄11′ Twenty-Fifth

2⁄3′ Twenty-Sixth

1⁄2′ Gemshorn Twenty-Ninth

1⁄4′ Gemshorn Thirty-Sixth

32′ Fagotto

16′ Contra Oboe

16′ Clarinet

16′ Vox Humana

8′ Oboe

8′ Clarinet

8′ Vox Humana

4′ Oboe

4′ Clarinet

4′ Vox Humana

Chimes

8′ Marimba Repeat

8′ Marimba Stroke

4′ Glockenspiel Repeat

4′ Glockenspiel Single

2′ Glockenspiel Single

Snare Drum Roll

Snare Drum Tap

Snare Drums Roll

Snare Drums Tap

Wood Block

Castinets

Triangle

Tom Tom

GREAT (Manual II)

32′ Sub Principal 121 pipes

16′ Double Diapason I 97 pipes

16′ Double Diapason II 73 pipes

16′ Double Diapason III 73 pipes

10-2⁄3′ Sub Quint 73 pipes

8′ Principal

8′ Diapason I 73 pipes

8′ Diapason II 73 pipes

8′ Diapason III 73 pipes

8′ Diapason IV 73 pipes

8′ Diapason V 73 pipes

8′ Diapason VI 73 pipes

8′ Diapason VII 73 pipes

8′ Diapason VIII 73 pipes

8′ Diapason IX 73 pipes

8′ Diapason X 73 pipes

8′ Harmonic Flute 73 pipes

8′ Flute Overte 73 pipes

5-1⁄3′ Quint 73 pipes

4′ Octave I 73 pipes

4′ Octave II 73 pipes

4′ Octave III 73 pipes

4′ Octave

4′ Octave IV 73 pipes

4′ Octave V 73 pipes

4′ Harmonic Flute 73 pipes

3-1⁄5′ Gross Tierce 73 pipes

2-2⁄3′ Major Twelfth 73 pipes

2′ Fifteenth I 73 pipes

2′ Fifteenth II 73 pipes

2′ Fifteenth III 73 pipes

2′ Principal

5-1⁄3′ Rausch Quint 146 pipes

2-2⁄3′ Rausch Quint 146 pipes

Grand Cornet XI 803 pipes

Major Sesquialtera V 365 pipes

Furniture VI 414 pipes

Schulze Mixture V 365 pipes

Scharff Mixture III

Doublette Mixture II

16′ Trumpet 73 pipes

8′ Harmonic Trumpet 73 pipes

4′ Clarion 73 pipes

Brass Chorus (floating)

Chimes 37 tubes

8′ Harp 61 bars

4′ Harp

4′ Xylophone 49 bars

2′ Xylophone

Snare Drum Roll

Snare Drum Tap

Snare Drums Roll

Snare Drums Tap

Triangle

Tambourine

Castinets

Wood Block Stroke

Wood Block Roll

Tom Tom

Chimes S. T.

Drums Muffled S. T.

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

String III (floating)

Gallery I Reeds (floating)

Gallery II Flutes (floating)

Gallery III Diapasons (floating)

Gallery IV Orchestral (floating)

BRASS CHORUS (floating)

16′ Trombone 73 pipes

8′ Trombone 73 pipes

8′ Tromba 73 pipes

5-1⁄3′ Tromba Quint 73 pipes

4′ Trombone 73 pipes

2-2⁄3′ Tromba Twelfth 73 pipes

2′ Trombone 73 pipes

Tierce Mixture III 219 pipes

GRAND GREAT (Manual II)

8′ Principal

8′ Tibia Clausa

8′ Tibia Major

4′ Tibia Melody (melody coupler)

8′ Viol

4′ Viol Melody (melody coupler)

4′ Octave

2′ Super Octave

32′ Dulzian (currently playing at 16′)

16′ Trombone

8′ Trombone Melody (melody coupler)

8′ Ophicleide (100′′)

8′ Trumpet

4′ Clarion

4′ Clarion Melody (melody coupler)

GREAT SECOND TOUCH (Manual II)

8′ Viol Phonon

8′ Viol Cello

8′ Viol

8′ Viol

8′ Solo (coupler)

4′ Solo (coupler)

8′ Fanfare (coupler)

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

Gallery I Reeds (floating)

Brass Chorus (floating)

GREAT-SOLO (Manual II)

16′ Wald Flute 97 pipes

16′ Tibia Clausa 97 pipes

16′ Contra Geigen 97 pipes

10-2⁄3′ Wald Quint

10-2⁄3′ Tibia Quint

8′ Diapason Phonon 73 pipes

8′ Horn Diapason 85 pipes

8′ Geigen Principal

8′ Gemshorn 121 pipes

8′ Gemshorn Celeste 89 pipes

8′ Wald Flute

8′ Tibia Clausa

8′ Doppel Gedeckt 73 pipes

8′ Viola D’Gamba 73 pipes

8′ Vox Celeste 73 pipes

6-2⁄5′ Gemshorn Terz 97 pipes

5-1⁄3′ Wald Quint

5-1⁄3′ Gemshorn Quint 109 pipes

4-4⁄7′ Septieme 97 pipes

4′ Octave Phonon

4′ Octave

4′ Principal

4′ Gemshorn

4′ Gemshorn Celeste

4′ Wald Flute

4′ Stopped Flute

4′ Doppel Flute

4′ Viola

4′ Viola Celeste

3-1⁄5′ Gemshorn Tenth

3-1⁄5′ Tenth

2-2⁄3′ Flute Twelfth

2-2⁄3′ Minor Twelfth

2-2⁄3′ Twelfth

2-2⁄7′ Octave Septieme

2′ Fifteenth

2′ Geigen

2′ Gemshorn

2′ Piccolo

1-3⁄5′ Gemshorn Seventeenth

1-3⁄5′ Seventeenth

1-1⁄3′ Nineteenth

1-1⁄7′ Twenty-First

1′ Twenty-Second

4⁄5′ Twenty-Fourth

2⁄3′ Twenty-Sixth

1⁄2′ Twenty-Ninth

1⁄4′ Thirty-Sixth (currently plays Gong)

16′ Oboe Horn 97 pipes

16′ Krummhorn 97 pipes

16′ Saxophone 97 pipes

16′ English Horn 97 pipes

16′ French Horn 97 pipes

16′ Vox Baryton 97 pipes

8′ Oboe

8′ Clarinet 85 pipes

8′ Krummhorn

8′ Orchestral Saxophone 85 pipes

8′ Saxophone

8′ English Horn

8′ Orchestral Horn 85 pipes

2-2⁄3′ Flute Twelfth 73 pipes (originally 8′ French Horn)

8′ French Horn

8′ Kinura 73 pipes

8′ Vox Humana 85 pipes

8′ Vox Humana

4′ Octave Horn

4′ Krummhorn

4′ Saxophone

4′ English Horn

4′ French Horn

4′ Vox Humana

SOLO (Manual IV)

16′ Major Flute 85 pipes

10-2⁄3′ Quint Flute

8′ Stentor Diapason 61 pipes

8′ Diapason (fr. Grand Chorus IX)

8′ Tibia Rex 61 pipes

8′ Major Flute

8′ Hohl Flute 61 pipes

8′ Flute Overte 61 pipes

8′ Cello Pomposa 61 pipes

8′ Cello Celeste 61 pipes

8′ Violin 61 pipes

8′ Violin Celeste 61 pipes

5-1⁄3′ Quint Flute

4′ Stentor Octave 61 pipes

4′ Octave (fr. Grand Chorus IX)

4′ Wald Flute 61 pipes

4′ Major Flute

4′ Viola Pomposa 61 pipes

2′ Harmonic Piccolo 61 pipes

Grand Chorus IX 549 pipes

Carillon IV 244 pipes

16′ Tuba Magna (50′′) 85 pipes

16′ Trumpet Profunda 85 pipes

10-2⁄3′ Quint Trumpet

8′ Tuba Imperial (100′′) 61 pipes

8′ Tuba Magna (50”)

8′ Trumpet Royal 61 pipes

8′ Trumpet Profunda

8′ Bugle (50′′) 61 pipes

8′ English Post Horn 61 pipes

8′ French Horn 61 pipes (originally 22⁄3′ Flute Twelfth)

5-1⁄3′ Magna Fifth (50′′)

4′ Tuba Clarion (50′′)

4′ Trumpet Clarion

Brass Chorus (floating)

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

String III (floating)

Gallery I Reeds (floating)

Gallery II Flutes (floating)

Gallery III Diapasons (floating)

Gallery IV Orchestral (floating)

SOLO-GREAT (Manual IV)

16′ Wald Flute

16′ Tibia Clausa

16′ Contra Geigen

10-2⁄3′ Wald Quint

10-2⁄3′ Tibia Quint

8′ Diapason Phonon

8′ Horn Diapason

8′ Geigen Principal

8′ Gemshorn

8′ Gemshorn Celeste

8′ Wald Flute

8′ Tibia Clausa

8′ Doppel Gedeckt

8′ Viola D’Gamba

8′ Vox Celeste

6-2⁄5′ Gemshorn Terz

5-1⁄3′ Wald Quint

5-1⁄3′ Gemshorn Quint

4-4⁄7′ Gemshorn Septieme

4′ Octave Phonon

4′ Octave

4′ Octave Geigen

4′ Gemshorn

4′ Gemshorn Celeste

4′ Wald Flute

4′ Stopped Flute

4′ Doppel Flute

4′ Viola

4′ Viola Celeste

3-1⁄5′ Gemshorn Tenth

3-1⁄5′ Gemshorn Tenth

2-2⁄3′ Flute Twelfth

2-2⁄3′ Flute Twelfth (originally 8′ Fr. Horn)

2-2⁄3′ Minor Twelfth

2-2⁄3′ Gemshorn Twelfth

2-2⁄7′ Octave Septieme

2′ Fifteenth

2′ Geigen

2′ Gemshorn

2′ Piccolo

1-3⁄5′ Gemshorn Seventeenth

1-3⁄5′ Gemshorn Seventeenth

1-1⁄3′ Gemshorn Nineteenth

1-1⁄7′ Twenty-First

1′ Twenty-Second

4⁄5′ Twenty-Fourth

2⁄3′ Twenty-Sixth

1⁄2′ Twenty-Ninth

1⁄4′ Thirty-Sixth

16′ Oboe Horn

16′ Krummhorn

16′ Saxophone

16′ English Horn

16′ French Horn

16′ Vox Baryton

8′ Oboe

8′ Clarinet

8′ Krummhorn

8′ Orchestral Saxophone

8′ Saxophone

8′ English Horn

8′ Orchestral Horn

8′ French Horn

8′ Kinura

8′ Vox Humana

8′ Vox Humana

4′ Octave Horn

4′ Krummhorn

4′ Saxophone

4′ English Horn

4′ French Horn

4′ Vox Humana

Chimes

8′ Harp

4′ Harp

4′ Xylophone

2′ Xylophone

ECHO (Manual VI)

16′ Contra Violone 97 pipes

16′ Contra Gamba 85 pipes

16′ Contra Spire Flute 109 pipes

8′ Diapason 61 pipes

8′ Waldhorn 61 pipes

8′ Clarabella 97 pipes

8′ Spire Flute

8′ Spitz Flute 61 pipes

8′ Flute Celeste I 61 pipes

8′ Flute Celeste II 77 pipes

8′ Flute Sylvestre 61 pipes

8′ Flute Celeste 61 pipes

8′ Tibia Mollis 61 pipes

8′ Violone

8′ Violone Celeste 54 pipes

8′ Gamba

4′ Open Flute

4′ Rohr Flute 61 pipes

4′ Cone Flute

4′ Viol

4′ Gamba

3-1⁄5′ Spitz Tenth

2-2⁄3′ Flute Twelfth

2-2⁄3′ Spire Flute Twelfth

2′ Flute Fifteenth

2′ Spire Flute Fifteenth

1-3⁄5′ Spitz Seventeenth

1-1⁄3′ Spire Flute Nineteenth

1′ Spire Flute Twenty-Second

Aetheria VI 366 pipes

16′ Tuba D’Amour 85 pipes

16′ Contra Bassoon 85 pipes

16′ Chalumeau 85 pipes

16′ Vox Humana 85 pipes

8′ Tuba D’Amour

8′ Trumpet Minor 61 pipes

8′ Clarinet

8′ Cor D’Amour 61 pipes

8′ Bassoon

8′ Vox Humana I 61 pipes

8′ Vox Humana II

4′ Octave Clarinet

4′ Tuba D’Amour

4′ Octave Bassoon

4′ Vox Humana

Chimes 25 tubes

String I (floating)

String II (floating)

String III (floating)

Gallery I Reeds (floating)

Gallery II Flutes (floating)

Gallery III Diapasons (floating)

Gallery IV Orchestral (floating)

GALLERY MASTERS

Gallery I Reeds to Bombard

Gallery II Flutes to Bombard

Gallery III Diapasons to Bombard

Gallery IV Orchestral to Bombard

TREMOLOS

Trem Master (affects all Tremolos)

Tremolos Left:

String III

Fanfare Pileata

Fanfare

Gallery IV

Sw-Ch Vox Humana

Swell-Choir

Swell

String I

Choir Philomela

Choir

Open Choir

Tremolos Right:

Great Tibia

Solo 20′′

Gt-Solo Organ Tone

Gt-Solo Wood Wind

String II

Echo

Items in italics await restoration and thus are not operating at present.

Further information about the Midmer-Losh and Kimball pipe organs, including detailed specifications and documentation, can be found at www.boardwalkorgans.org.

Photo: The organ restoration staff (left to right): James Martin, shop apprentice; Carl Hersom, shop apprentice; Scott Banks, membership and events coordinator; Brant Duddy, senior shop technician; Nathan Bryson, curator of pipe organs; Chuck Gibson, professional assistant to the curator

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