Cover Feature (New Organs)

Glück New York

Congregation Emanu-El, New York City

From the Chief Organist

Playing the largest and most comprehensive synagogue organ in history was
not in my thoughts when I began my organ studies so many decades ago. The new
Glück organ, the third instrument for the great sanctuary, and the largest
of three pipe organs in the temple complex, is unique in that the builder
brought his lifetime of familiarity with the literature and liturgy of the
synagogue into the design. Congregation Emanu-El is now served by a most
appropriate instrument.

The 1929 Casavant opened by Marcel Dupré quickly earned international
fame. Concert series and choral festivals abounded in the following years.
Music was written specifically for the instrument, and the congregation
commissioned many new choral works. Under the direction of Dr. Robert S. Baker,
major mechanical and tonal changes were made to the organ in the 1950s. That
version of the organ was presented to the public by the late Sir George
Thalben-Ball at the 1956 convention of the American Guild of Organists.

By the late 1980s, entire divisions of the organ were silent, and the rest
was going quickly. The organ was regularly tuned, yet had never been
releathered, and had suffered steam and water damage. The roar of leaking wind
was disruptive to worship services, and the temple began the process of
assessment, looking toward a major rebuild or replacement of the organ. A
handful of North American builders were asked to bid on the project, including
Sebastian M. Glück, who had built our 34-rank Beth-El Chapel organ.

Mr. Glück proposed an enlarged instrument in a style he dubbed
"Anglo-French Romantic Neoclassicism," promising to respect the
intent of the 1929 organ by retaining what could be restored of the remaining
original pipework. I had been concerned that Mr. Glück's many mixtures and
big reed choruses might bring too great a change to our ears, but the 135-rank
organ is an instrument of great dignity and grandeur, simultaneously powerful
and elegant.

The stoplist combines academic discipline with artistic daring, and music of
all eras can be played convincingly. While not a single tone color is
duplicated, the organ's voices blend seamlessly. This was achieved by his
insistence that he voice and tonally finish every pipe in the room, on the very
windchest from which it was to sing. Our seventeen-voice professional choir
(expanded to 26 on Holy Days) has noted the difference in the way they hear and
sing with the organ.

The new console matches the elegant blend of Art Deco and Byzantine ornament
seen in the 1929 temple complex. Rosewood, cow bone, pao ferro, walnut, brass,
and polished onyx are among the luxurious materials chosen by the builder, a
lifelong organist and trained preservation architect. Despite 137 stop
controls, six expression pedals, and a full combination action, the console is
understated and free of unnecessary gadgetry.

The rabbis, administration, trustees, and music committee are all to be
commended and thanked for their vision and perseverance. They have set an
example for other Reform synagogues, and have assured Congregation Emanu-El's
musical future.

--Hunter Tillman

From the Tonal Director

When Gottfried Federlein, Stephen Stoot, and Joseph-Claver Casavant designed
the original organ for Congregation Emanu-El, they faced the task of scaling
pipes for a sanctuary that had not been built, designed to accommodate 2,500
people in cushioned pews. As were many sanctuaries of the era, Emanu-El was
clad with sound-absorbing artificial stone. Although the bimah style='font-style:normal'> precinct at the East is lined with rare jewel stones
and framed by breathtaking mosaics, the organ must speak through a heavy
ornamental plaster grille before reaching the vast sanctuary. After the
building opened, the polished fossil stone of the central aisle was covered by
carpet.

In the 1950s significant revisions were made to the organ in accordance with
the prevailing tastes and theories of the time. Pressures were drastically
lowered, and 44 ranks, including the entire Choir division and all of the
chorus reeds, were discarded and replaced by pipes of much smaller scale.
Quintadenas and Cymbals replaced open flutes. Add-on windchests of incompatible
design made the newly enfeebled wind supply unsteady. Despite the organ's
"classical" makeover, the organ was no more effective, as the old and
new seemed to share a space, but not a musical goal.

When the organ was taken down, Emanu-El coordinated asbestos abatement,
plastering, and painting within the instrument as a prelude to the installation
of new fluorescent lighting, condensation drip pans, utility outlets, smoke
detection systems, and air conditioning.

I had to return to high pressures if I was to achieve the musical goals I
had set in my new tonal design. I also knew that the sluggish action and the
inability to tune the original pipes to concert pitch was the result of the
wind supply problem. I designed a new wind system of 17 reservoirs with
removable heads, sprung and weighted using an adjustable system of barbell
plates. Perimeter compression spring assemblies assure that the heads remain
airtight through changes in humidity, and can be taken out and rebuilt as bench
work. The historic pipes told me when they were comfortable singing, and the
new pressures were in the same range as our two slightly differing reference
points, which were the pressures given in Casavant's publicity at the time, and
the graffiti left by the installers in 1929.

Rigid wind lines were built for portions of the organ that were added or
relocated, and both original Spencer turbines were retained, one above the bimah style='font-style:normal'> tribune in the East tower, the other beneath the
vaulting at the West end near Central Park. The Casavant pitman windchests that
were retained were completely stripped down and rebuilt or replicated in our
shop, as were all special pneumatic actions, from the selectable Celesta
dampers and the nine-stage shutter engines to the wooden boots and pneumatic
starters for the 32' Contra Trombone.

All mechanical components from the 1950s were removed, and all of the new
windchests are electro-pneumatic pouch actions. I wanted to voice and finish
the entire organ on wind that enters the pipes in the same manner, on actions
that operate with the same speed and range of motion. New tremulants were
provided, and I took my cue from Britain by leaving the high pressure sections
of the Swell and Solo departments off the tremulants.

The 65 Casavant ranks that were restorable feature substantial pipe metal,
generous cutups, and impressive scales. Cleaning and conservation was required
throughout, and restoration of the badly altered toe holes brought the tone
into line. For the most part, cutups seemed to be relatively unaltered. With
the exception of the two full-length 32' octaves and some of the largest 16'
pipes, all of that pipework, which constitutes half of the new instrument, was
removed for cleaning and restoration. The titanic 32' Trombone resonators were
rebuilt in the main chamber, rigged to a catwalk 100 feet above the bimah style='font-style:normal'>. Shellac was the finish of choice for zinc basses
and wooden pipes, since it is renewable and traditional.

Each manual division contains one or more 8' Open Diapasons, and all normal
divisions contain fully developed Diapason choruses. Mixtures vary in scaling
and composition, but have several common characteristics. In sections of the
progressions that contain an odd number of ranks, the balance is set in favor
of the unisons, rather than the quints, lending clarity to voice leading in
contrapuntal work and choral accompaniment. All regular chorus mixtures bear
harmonics of the 8' series, even in the extreme treble. In each of the three
traditional manual departments, there is at least one flue and one reed at 16'
pitch, so gravity in all schools of literature can be achieved without muddying
the mixtures with contraquints in a dead acoustic.

That notwithstanding, three of the Emanu-El mixtures contain sub-unison
harmonics. The Grand Chorus V sports a bold 51/3' in the treble, the upper
range of the Harmonics V contains a 31/5' and a 22/7', and the Cornet des
Violes V retains its original sub-tierce throughout its compass.

Flutes of varied construction and material are present throughout the
specification, especially open flutes, from harmonic flutes in both wood and
metal, to the Major Open Flute in the Solo, to the Open Wood Flute in the
Great, the only discarded Casavant rank we miraculously found and reinstated.
It is distinguished by having its mouths wider than the depth of the pipe. The
Swell Flûte Harmonique is, in part, from Aeolian-Skinner's Opus 851 of
1931 for Trinity College, Hartford. It replaces a Quintadena that was
substituted for the original harmonic flute in the 1929 design.

Three jeux de tierce are present in
the main divisions: the mounted Cornet in the Great, the cornet
décomposé in the Choir, and the Sesquialtera in the Swell. They
weld with the many Trumpets and Clarions in the organ to form a thrilling Grand
Jeu.

The famous 13-rank Orchestral String Ensemble had been silent for many
years, and its reinstatement made a stunning contribution to the organ. With
nine 73-note undulating stops in a manual string complement of nearly three dozen
ranks, supported by two independent 16' Pedal strings, Emanu-El's lushness is
legendary. Gottfried Federlein, composer, organist, and early music specialist
long before the term was coined, was also a fan of Robert Hope-Jones and the
cinema organ. Interestingly, the Temple that had just merged with Emanu-El,
Temple Beth-El (after whom the chapel is named) had just dedicated their 1924
IV/106 Möller, complete with its 14-rank string department designed by Dr.
Clarence Dickinson.

Matched reed choruses of differing styles are found in each division:
"close," round English tone in the Choir; rich, chocolatey and
brilliant "free" English Trumpets in the Great; fiery French
Bertounêche Bombardes in the Swell; and brassy, rolling English Trombones
in the Pedal. The brilliant fanfare reeds with open German shallots in the Solo
actually sound rather French in that acoustic, due to the open shallots,
extreme pressure, and harmonic resonators. The ceremonial Temple trumpets, or Chazozerot style='font-style:normal'>, are pure-toned, bright English Tubas, and are
available at three pitches, floating as a division. The 26" pressure reeds
take a commanding position above the North triforium at the spring of The Great
Arch. They are voiced and finished to crown, not to obliterate, the grand symphonic
ensemble.

Among the lyric solo reeds are the Baroque Musette, the Willis-style
Orchestral Oboe, the French Horn, the woody orchestral Clarinet, and the
Hautbois, with coned-in bells that I hammered to shape on site. The Shofar in
the Echo department, of odd construction and possibly altered several times in
attempts to generate an impression of the ram's horn, is merely listed as
"Muted Trumpet (for use in the Torah Service)" on some documents.

The Solo English Horn, a rare and beautiful free-reed stop, had its treble
half replaced by striking reeds in the 1950s. A stop of nearly identical
construction is shown in engravings in Audsley. I located a matching 1919
Casavant free-reed English Horn over the Internet, and this gem was returned to
the instrument by restoring and splicing the two ranks together. It sounds more
like a plaintive and pungent Basset Horn than an English Horn, but it remains a
favorite of the congregation.

Special thanks are due to the craftspeople of Glück New York, Inc., all
of whom are not only exceptional artists, but also degreed professional
musicians. General manager and foreman Albert Jensen-Moulton makes each project
a meticulous effort that comes in on time and on budget. Much of the project
was managed by Lynette Pfund, a dedicated conservator whose excitement never
faltered. The rest of the company family is made up of Lynette's husband,
Christopher Pfund, and Dominic Inferrera, both of whom will take on the most
complex procedures under the most daunting conditions. Best of all, they all
put up with me, and trusted that this enormous undertaking would result in
artistic success.

--Sebastian M. Glück

Specifications and color photographs of other Glück instruments may be
seen on the firm's website: <www.glucknewyork.com/>.

Photographs by Albert Jensen-Moulton.

GREAT ORGAN (II, unenclosed)

                  6"
wind pressure

                  8"
wind pressure (*)

                  Bimah
Tribune North

                  Mechanicals
level 1, pipes level 2

16'           Double
Open Diapason  61, C, Pb

16'           Bourdon style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61, C, W

8'              First
Open Diapason  61, C, Pb

8'              Second
Open Diapason  61, C, Pb

8'              Third
Open Diapason  61, C, Pb

8'              Open
Flute  61, C, W

8'              Chimney
Flute  61, C, W

8'              Gemshorn style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61, C, Cm

4'              Principal style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61, C, Cm

4'              Octave style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61, C, Cm

4'              Harmonic
Flute  61, C, Cm

22/3 '      Twelfth style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61, C, Cm

2'              Fifteenth style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61, C, Cm

V              Cornet
(G20-G56)  185, Sp

V-VII     Mixture
Major  378, style="mso-spacerun: yes"> Sp

IV            Sharp
Mixture  244, Sp

16'           Double
Trumpet*  61, Sp

 8'             Trumpet* style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

4'              Clarion* style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

                  Chimes
(in Echo)  21 tubes

                  Celesta style='mso-tab-count:1'>

 

SWELL ORGAN (III, enclosed)

                  8"
wind pressure

                  10"
wind pressure (*)

                  Bimah
Tribune North

                  Mechanicals
level 3, pipes level 4

16'           Bourdon
Doux  73,  C, W

8'              Open
Diapason  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Pb

8'              Stopped
Diapason  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, W

8'              Flûte
Harmonique  73, Sp

8'              Viole
de Gambe  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

8'              Voix
Céleste  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

8'              Æoline style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73,  C, Sp

8'              Flûte
Conique  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Cm

8'              Flûte
Céleste  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Cm

4'              Principal style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73,  C, Cm

4'              Violina style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73,  C, Cm

4'              Flauto
Traverso  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, W

2'              Piccolo style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61, C, Cm

I-II           Sesquialtera style="mso-spacerun: yes">  110, Cm

III             Clear
Mixture  183, Cm

III-IV     Full
Mixture*  214, Sp

16'           Bombarde
Harmonique*  73, Sp

8'              Trompette
Harmonique*  73, Sp

8'              Hautbois style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, Sp

8'              Voix
Humaine  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Pb

4'              Clairon
Harmonique*  73, Sp

                  Tremulant

CHOIR ORGAN (I, enclosed)

                  61/2"
wind pressure

                  North
Triforium

                  Mechanicals
level 1, pipes levels 2 & 3

                  Deagan
Celesta level 4

16'           Gemshorn style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, Sp

8'              Open
Diapason  73, Sp

8'              Melodia style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, W

8'              Gamba style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, Sp

8'              Gamba
Céleste  73, Sp

8'              Dolce style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, Sp

8'              Dolce
Céleste  73, Sp

4'              Principal style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, Sp

4'              Chimney
Flute  73, Sp

22/3'       Nazard style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

2'              Recorder style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

13/5'       Tierce style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

III             Mixture style="mso-spacerun: yes">  219, Sp

16'           Bassoon style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, Cm

8'              Trumpet style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, Cm

8'              Clarinet style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, Cm

4'              Clarion style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, Cm

                  Tremulant

                  Celesta style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61

                  Celesta
Dampers Off

                  Great/Choir
Transfer

SOLO ORGAN (IV, enclosed)

                  Main
section

                  10"
wind pressure

                  Above
the Great Arch, North

                  Mechanicals
level 5, pipes level 6

8'              Stentorphone style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, C, Pb

8'              Major
Open Flute  73, C, W

8'              Violoncello style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, C, Sp

4'              Fugara style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73, C, Cm

V              Grand
Chorus  305, Sp

V              Harmonics style="mso-spacerun: yes">  305, C, Cm

8'              English
Horn (free reeds )  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

8'              Orchestral
Oboe  73,  C, Sp

                  Tremulant

 

                  Brass
section

                  15"
wind pressure

                  Above
the Great Arch, South

                  Mechanicals
level 5, pipes level 6

16'           Bombarde
Harmonique  73, Sp

8'              Trompette
Harmonique  73, Sp

8'              French
Horn  73,  C, Sp

4'              Clairon
Harmonique  73, Sp

                  Chimes

                  Celesta

STRING ENSEMBLE (enclosed)

                  131/2"
wind pressure

                  Bimah
Tribune, North

                  Mechanicals
level 5, pipes level 6

16'           Contra
Gamba  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

8'              Grand
Gamba  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

8'              Grand
Gamba Céleste  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

8'              First
Violin (parent)  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

8'              Second
Violin (sharp)  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

8'              Third
Violin (flat)  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

4'              Viola style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73,  C, Sp

4'              Viola
Céleste  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

V              Cornet
des Violes  353, C, Sp

                  Tremulant

ECHO ORGAN (enclosed)

                  8"
wind pressure

                  Southwest
Tower Gallery

                  Mechanicals
level 1, pipes level 2

                  25-note
Deagan Class A Chimes level 3

8'              Open
Diapason  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Pb

8'              Cor
de Nuit  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Cm

8'              Viole
Ætheria  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

8'              Voix
Mystique  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Sp

4'              Spire
Flute  73, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  C, Cm

8'              Shofar style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73,  C, Sp

8'              Musette style="mso-spacerun: yes">  73,  C, Sp

                  Tremulant

TUBA ORGAN (unenclosed)

                  26"
wind pressure

                  North
Spring of the Great Arch

                  Level
5

4'              Tuning
Reference  12, Ht

16'           Chazozerot
(from C13)

8'              Chazozerot style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

4'              Chazozerot style="mso-spacerun: yes">  12, Sp

PEDAL ORGAN (unenclosed)

                  7"
wind pressure

                  12"
wind pressure (*)

                  Bimah
Tribune, South

                  Mechanicals
levels 1 & 5

                  Pipes
levels 1 through 6

32'           Grand
Open Bass  12, C, W

16'           Open
Diapason Wood  32, C, W

16'           Open
Diapason Metal (Great)

16'           Violone style='mso-tab-count:1'> 32 
C, Sp

16'           Dulciana style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, C, Sp

16'           Gemshorn
(Choir)

16'           First
Bourdon  32, C, style="mso-spacerun: yes"> W

16'           Second
Bourdon (Great)

16'           Bourdon
Doux (Swell)

102/3'    Quint style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, C, W

8'              Principal style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, Sp

8'              Open
Flute  12, C, W

8'              Violoncello style="mso-spacerun: yes">  12, C, Sp

8'              Stopped
Flute  12, C, W

4'              Fifteenth style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, Sp

4'              Open
Flute  12, C, W

IV            Mixture style="mso-spacerun: yes">  128, Sp

 32'          Contra
Trombone*  12, C, Zn

16'           Trombone* style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, C, Cm

16'           Bassoon
(Choir)

8'              Trumpet* style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, Sp

4'              Clarion* style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, Sp

                  Chimes

ECHO PEDAL ORGAN 

                  (enclosed,
except for Principal)

                  7"
wind pressure

                  Southwest
Tower Gallery

                  Mechanicals
level 1, pipes level 2

16'           Sub
Bass  32, C, W

8'              Principal style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, Sp

8'              Stopped
Flute  12, C, W

CHAPEL GREAT (II, unenclosed)

                  4"
wind pressure

                  In
West Gallery arch

16'           Infrabass
(prepared)

8'              Principal style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

8'              Gemshorn
(prepared)

4'              Octave style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61, Mö, Sp

4'              Spire
Flute (prepared)

2'              Doublet style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

IV-V       Chorus
Mixture 268, Sp

8'              Posaune
(ext. Pedal)  17, Cm

                  Carillon

CHAPEL SWELL (III, enclosed)

                  4"
wind pressure

                  West
Gallery, South Chamber

8'              Viola
Pomposa  68, Sp

8'              Viola
Pomposa Céleste  68, Sp

8'              Bourdon
en Bois  68, Mö, W

4'              Prestant style="mso-spacerun: yes">  68, Sp

4'              Flûte
Harmonique  68, Ht

2'              Octavin style="mso-spacerun: yes">  68, Mö, Sp

II              Sesquialtera
(prepared)

II-IV       Corona style="mso-spacerun: yes">  202, Sp

8'              Trompette style="mso-spacerun: yes">  68, Sp

8'              Hautbois style="mso-spacerun: yes">  68, Cm

                  Tremulant

CHOIR (I, enclosed)

                  4"
wind pressure

                  West
Gallery, North Chamber

8'              Dulciana style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

8'              Unda
Maris  49, Sp

8'              Flauto
Doppio  61, W

4'              Fugara style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61,  Sp

4'              Flauto
Tedesco  61, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  Sp

22/3'       Nasard
(prepared)

2'              Corno
di Notte  61, style="mso-spacerun: yes">  Sp

III-IV     Loquatio style="mso-spacerun: yes">  208, Sp

8'              Clarinetto style="mso-spacerun: yes">  61, Pb

                  Tremulant

CHAPEL CHAZOZEROT (floating)

16'           Herald
Trumpet (prepared)

8'              Festival
Trumpet (prepared)

4'              Fanfare
Clarion (prepared)

CHAPEL PEDAL

                  4"
wind pressure

                  West
Gallery, distributed

16'           Contrebasse
(prepared)

16'           Viola
Magna 12, Zn

16'           Soubasse style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, 19th, W

16'           Infrabass
(Great)

8'              Octave style="mso-spacerun: yes">  12, Zn

8'              Soubasse style="mso-spacerun: yes">  12, 19th, W

8'              Bourdon
(Swell)

8'              Viola
(Swell)

51/3'       Twelfth
(prepared)

4'              Fifteenth style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, Sp

4'              Pommer
(Swell)

2'              Twenty-Second style="mso-spacerun: yes">  12, Sp

IV            Mixture
(prepared)

32'           Harmonics
(derived)

16'           Ophicleide style="mso-spacerun: yes">  32, Cm

8'              Trumpet style="mso-spacerun: yes">  12, Cm

4'              Clarion style="mso-spacerun: yes">  12, Cm

                  Carillon

 

Abbreviations

C              1929
Casavant Opus 1322

           1924
Möller, Temple Beth-El

19th        19th
century

W             wood

Pb            lead

Cm           "common
metal" (35% tin)

Sp            "spotted
metal" (50% tin)

Ht             Hoyt
2-ply metal

Zn            Zinc

Mixture Compositions

Sanctuary Organ

GREAT ORGAN

                  Mixture
Major (2') V-VII

C1            15.19.22.26.29

C13         12.15.19.22.26.29

C25         08.12.15.19.22.26

C37         01.01.08.12.15.19.22

F#43      01.01.08.12.15.19

C#50      01.01.08.08.12.15

 

                  Sharp
Mixture (1') IV

C1            22.26.29.33

C13         19.22.26.29

C25         15.19.22.26

C37         12.15.19.22

C49         08.12.15.19

F#55      01.08.12.15

                  Cornet
(8') V

G20        01.08.12.15.17

SWELL ORGAN

                  Sesquialtera
(22/3') I-II

C1            12

C13         12.17

D#52      08.12

Clear Mixture (2') III

C1            15.19.22

C#38      08.15.19

C#50      01.08.12

                  Full
Mixture (2') III-IV

C1            15.19.22

F#19      12.15.19.22

F#31      08.12.15.19

C#50      01.08.12.15

CHOIR ORGAN

                  Mixture
(2') III

C1            15.19.22

C#50      08.12.15

C#62      08.12.15

SOLO ORGAN

                  Grand
Chorus (4') V

C1            08.12.15.19.22

G#21      05.
08.12.15.19

F42         01.05.08.12.15

                  Harmonics
(2') V

C1            15.17.19.21b.22

G#45      08.10.12.14b.15

STRING ENSEMBLE

                  Cornet
des Violes (4') V

C1            08.10.12.15.17

C#50      08.10.12.15

PEDAL ORGAN

                  Mixture
(22/3') IV

C1            19.22.26.29

Beth-El Chapel Organ

GREAT ORGAN

                  Chorus
Mixture (11/3') IV-V

C1            19.22.26.29

C13         15.19.22.26

C25         08.12.15.19.22

C37         01.08.12.15.19

C49         01.08.12.15

SWELL ORGAN

                  Corona
(11/3') II-IV

C1            19.22

C13         15.19.22

F#31      12.15.19.22

F#43      08.12.15.19

F#55      01.08.12.15

CHOIR ORGAN

                  Loquatio
(1') III-IV

C1            22.26.29

C13         19.22.26

C25         15.19.22

C37         12.15.19.22

C49         08.12.15.19

F#55      01.08.12.15

Leave A Comment

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt><dd><i>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.